May 2021

Housing Justice Opportunities in American Rescue Plan Act

Overview

This document provides information for housing organizers on how to use funds passed in the American Rescue Plan Act, a $1.9 trillion bill that passed in March 2021, to advance local and state housing justice campaigns. (Spanish Version)

May 2021

Oportunidades para la justicia de la vivienda en la Ley del Plan de Rescate Americano

Overview

Resumen

La Ley del Plan de Rescate Americano es un proyecto de ley de $1.9 trillones de dólares firmado por el Presidente Biden el 11 de marzo de 2021. Para les defensores de la justicia de la vivienda, hay dos piezas de financiación importantes que fueron aprobadas: fondos de recuperación fiscal locales y estatales y fondos de asistencia de vivienda. (English version)

August 2021

Beyond Recovery: Policy Recommendations to Prevent Evictions and Promote Housing Security in Santa Fe

Overview

Beyond Recovery presents solutions to keep Santa Fe families housed through the duration of the Covid-19 crisis. It describes 15 actions the city can take to create a more equitable housing system for all residents. It charts the immediate steps necessary to stop current evictions and prevent a flood of evictions as local, state, and federal eviction moratoria lift; codify tenant protections for the long term, and invest in a long-term equitable recovery that addresses the structural roots of our housing crisis.

This report is a collaboration between PolicyLink; Chainbreaker Collective; and Homes For All, a project of Right To The City Alliance. It is the third in a series on evictions in the Covid-19 era; the previous two reports were written as collaborations between Human Impact Partners and Chainbreaker Collective.

State Cancel Rent Model Ordinance Template

Overview

Rent cancellation matches the scope of the economic catastrophe ordinary households face. It is needed to ensure people can stay in their homes after eviction moratoriums end. Universal rent cancellation immediately and effectively reaches a huge swath of people, including those especially at risk of homelessness: people who are informally employed; lack a bank account or permanent address; or are undocumented.

This is a model ordinance for cancellation of rent and mortgages. It is written for a state. If you would like to request an editable copy of the ordinance, along with additional legal information, please fill out our contact form.

Local Cancel Rent Model Ordinance Template

Overview

Rent cancellation matches the scope of the economic catastrophe ordinary households face. It is needed to ensure people can stay in their homes after eviction moratoriums end. Universal rent cancellation immediately and effectively reaches a huge swath of people, including those especially at risk of homelessness: people who are informally employed; lack a bank account or permanent address; or are undocumented.

This is a model ordinance for cancellation of rent and mortgages. It is written for a local jurisdiction, such as a city or county. If you would like to request an editable copy of the ordinance, along with additional legal information, please fill out our contact form.

Eviction Moratorium Model Ordinance Template

Overview

Over 150 cities have passed some form of moratorium on evictions, foreclosures, and/or sweeps of unhoused people. However, many do not cover all evictions; have requirements on tenants to link financial hardship to COVID-19; are short in duration; and require tenants to pay back rent once the moratorium is lifted. This template model ordinance contains the elements of a strong policy from the Policy Summary to both halt current evictions and protect against future displacement. It was developed by the PolicyLink legal team based on the state model ordinance language developed by the National Housing Law Project, as well as language from existing ordinances. If you would like to request an editable copy of the ordinance, along with additional legal information, please fill out our contact form.

May 2021

Our Homes, Our Communities: How Housing Acquisition Strategies Can Create Affordable Housing, Stabilize Neighborhoods, and Prevent Displacement

Overview

The Covid-19 pandemic has exposed a housing system that is failing millions of low-income people and people of color. Millions of renters of color struggle to pay rent due to loss of income from the pandemic, or because their regular income can’t cover ever-increasing rent costs. Small property owners who control much of the lower rent buildings in cities may not be able to weather extended periods of reduced rental income. At the same time, a number of Wall Street firms have already created special acquisition funds to buy up buildings in financial distress. This crisis has created a new urgency for cities to protect their housing stock through equitable housing acquisition strategies. The potential of significant, new federal funding for affordable housing, along with a growing tenant movement for community ownership of land and housing, has created an unprecedented opportunity for an equitable recovery — but only if cities are ready with the local capacity, policies, and financial tools to move quickly to acquire buildings.

This report details strategies that cities can lead to creating equitable housing outcomes for residents by moving privately owned rental housing into tenant or nonprofit ownership to avoid speculation, promote community control, and create permanently affordable housing. It describes what an equitable housing acquisition strategy is, why cities should implement one now, and what are the local capacity, policy, and finance tools needed.

April 2020

Moratorium Policy Summary

Overview

In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, a broad moratorium on all evictions, foreclosures, and sweeps of homeless encampments is needed to protect public health. Moratoriums preserve access to shelter and ensure people are not displaced, slowing infections. No one should lose their home in these life-threatening conditions. Download this two-page policy summary of what should go into a strong moratorium on all evictions, foreclosures, and sweeps.

April 2020

Cancel Rent Policy Summary

Overview

Rent cancellation matches the scope of the economic catastrophe ordinary households face. It is needed to ensure people can stay in their homes after eviction moratoriums end. Universal rent cancellation immediately and effectively reaches a huge swath of people, including those especially at risk of homelessness: people who are informally employed; lack a bank account or permanent address; or are undocumented. Download this policy summary of what should go into policy to cancel rents and mortgages and reclaim our homes.

September 2020

The Coming Wave of Covid-19 Evictions: State and Local Fact Sheets

Overview

Over one third of residents in the United States are renters, including the majority of Black and Latino residents. Many renters were already facing a crisis due to soaring rents before the pandemic, and they have been hit hard by the virus and its economic impacts. Without long-term eviction protections, these renters are at risk of being caught in a coming wave of evictions which could force them out of their neighborhoods or even onto the street. In partnership with Our Homes, Our Health, the National Equity Atlas team created a series of fact sheets to support their work across the country to advance policies that protect renters at risk of eviction during the Covid-19 emergency. Our Homes, Our Health is a collaborative initiative of the National Housing Justice Grassroots Table, including the Center for Popular Democracy, Partnership for Working Families, People’s Action, the Right to the City Alliance, and Alliance for Housing Justice.

You can download fact sheets for the following states: California, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Oregon, and Washington. Fact sheets for the following local geographies are also available for download: Bay Area, CABedford County, TNContra Costa County, CA, San Mateo County, CA, and Sonoma County, CA. More fact sheets to come.

See the accompanying methodology for the state fact sheets. For the county fact sheets, please see the notes at the end of the individual fact sheets for a link to the methodology.